Domestic Violence -
You Matter... Love Shouldn't Hurt

Domestic violence is a behavior pattern based on the use of power and control of one person over another, in the context of dating, family or household relationship. Domestic violence maybe physical, psychological, sexual, stalking or economic. 1 in 4 women and 1 in 9 men were victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner with an impact such as injury, fear, concern for safety, needing services. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, published in 2017.]


The Mission of Saint Pascal Domestic Violence Ministry is: Awareness - Services - Prevention.

  • We raise awareness about Domestic Violence.
  • We direct victims and their families to resources which help provide freedom from violence.
  • We educate the community against Domestic Violence.

  • Prayer to End Domestic Violence
    "You Matter... Love Shouldn't Hurt" Ministry - Saint Pascal Parish, Chicago

    Domestic violence and abuse are about power and control, but God offers us deliverance, freedom and peace. It’s important we pray for victims’ healing and restoration, turning to the One who has the power to make all things new.

    Loving God be with women and men who are in doubt about the health of their relationships. Give them clarity of mind and peaceful hearts so that they can make good decisions guided by Your love. Let those who suffer abuse discern that they can seek help to learn how to care for themselves with Your help. Let those who exploit, acknowledge that they are harming the other, so they can learn to abhor and change their own behavior in true repentance and amendment of life.

    Teaching God open our ears, our eyes, and our hearts to be more compassionate, aware, outreaching, and supportive to people in abusive situations, so that they don’t feel alone and know that someone cares. Give us wisdom to plant seeds that encourage people to think and take urgent action to end domestic violence.

    Gracious God, we are created in Your image and You want us to live abundantly. Free those living with physical, mental or spiritual abuse from their oppression, so they find peace to enjoy a life full of Your blessings.

    Compassionate God protect the innocent children who suffer to witness violence and abuse at the hands of the ones they love. Bring them to a safe place where they can begin to heal.

    Merciful God touch the hearts of those who abuse others. Heal their thinking, so that they may turn to You and seek Your ways. Help them to know that every human being is a treasure to You. Help them to know that with true repentance to change they can begin a path to peace.

    Loving God, we pray for all victims of abuse. In their loneliness and pain, surround them with Your care to seek health, healing, strength, and peace.

    In the name of Jesus, we pray. Amen.

    (Adapted from beliefnet.com)


    The Saint Pascal Domestic Violence Ministry meetings are usually scheduled in the West Sacristy on Wednesday evenings 7:00 to 8:00 PM. However, to assure safety for all participants, we have suspended in-person meetings during the pandemic. :

    If you would like information about our parish ministry, please contact Kitty Medica at hellokit0728@gmail.com

    If you are interested in learning more about the Domestic Violence Outreach Ministry of the Archdiocese of Chicago, click this link Domestic Violence Outreach for resource information and our calendar


    Domestic Violence Newsletters

  • November 2019
  • Summer 2020
  • Fall 2020
  • In 1992 and again in 2002, the U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops issued a statement of the Church’s position on domestic violence: When I Call for Help: A Pastoral Response to Domestic Violence Against Women. “…violence against women, inside or outside the home is never justified”…“When violence occurs within a sacramental marriage…the person being assaulted needs to know that acting to end the abuse does not violate the marriage promises”…we emphasize that no person is expected to stay in an abusive marriage…Violence and abuse, not divorce, break up a marriage.”

    To read the full text of the Bishops’ Statement, click here.


    Domestic violence in the United States is epidemic! In an emergency, call 911. If someone you know needs help, call:

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline - 1-800-799-SAFE or 1-800-799-7233
  • Chicago Domestic Violence Hotline - 1-877-863-6338
  • Betweens Friends Hotline - 1-800-603-4357
  • Connections for Abused Women and Their Children Hotline - 1-773-278-4566
  • Sarah's Inn Hotline - 1-708-386-4225
  • There is never an excuse for physical, emotional, or sexual violence. Domestic violence is a crime. But there is hope.
    You can break the cycle of violence. Support and counseling are available close to home. Please call the Catholic Charities parish line 312-655-7106.


     

    Help to Prevent Domestic Violence


     



    How the Church Can Better Respond to the
    Problem of Domestic Violence

    By Mary Farrow

    Washington D.C., Jun 23, 2019 / 04:12 pm (Catholic News Agency).- This Sunday, in Catholic parishes across the country, one in four women sitting in the pews will have experienced severe physical violence in their own homes from their spouses or partners - including burns, choking, beating, or the use of a weapon against them. One in nine men will have experienced the same.

    According to one priest who is an expert in the subject, priests in the U.S. are still not doing enough to address the issue. “The Church has been complicit in this because we haven’t talked about it enough,” said Fr. Charles Dahm, a priest of the Chicago Archdiocese who leads its domestic violence outreach program…

    Priests have not been educated on domestic violence in the seminary, and so they do not expect to encounter it in the priesthood…

    A 2019 study from the Institute for Family Studies and the Wheatley Institution of Brigham Young University found that while religion offers many benefits to couples, it unfortunately does not positively impact their rates of domestic violence… Catholic couples experiencing domestic abuse should know that Canon Law, the governing law of the Church, addresses domestic violence, and states: “If either of the spouses causes grave mental or physical danger to the other spouse or to the offspring or otherwise renders common life too difficult, that spouse gives the other a legitimate cause for leaving, either by decree of the local ordinary or even on his or her own authority if there is danger in delay.” (Can. 1153 §1.)

    A 2019 study from the Institute for Family Studies and the Wheatley Institution of Brigham Young University found that while religion offers many benefits to couples, it unfortunately does not positively impact their rates of domestic violence… Catholic couples experiencing domestic abuse should know that Canon Law, the governing law of the Church, addresses domestic violence, and states: “If either of the spouses causes grave mental or physical danger to the other spouse or to the offspring or otherwise renders common life too difficult, that spouse gives the other a legitimate cause for leaving, either by decree of the local ordinary or even on his or her own authority if there is danger in delay.” (Can. 1153 §1.).

    …In 1992, the Catholic bishops of the U.S. wrote “When I Call for Help: A Pastoral Response to Domestic Violence Against Women”… “As pastors of the Catholic Church in the United States, we state as clearly and strongly as we can that violence against women, inside or outside the home, is never justified. Violence in any form —physical, sexual, psychological, or verbal —is sinful; often, it is a crime as well.”

    To read the full article, click here.


    Alarming Effects of Children's Exposure to Domestic Violence
    PSYCHOLOGY TODAY Posted Feb 26, 2019

    Children exposed to domestic violence may experience a range of difficulties….

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have reported that in homes where violence between partners occurs, there is a 45% to 60% chance of co-occurring child abuse, a rate 15 times higher than the average. Even when they are not physically attacked, children witness 68% to 80% of domestic assaults. These numbers are a sobering reminder of the toll a violent environment takes on kids…

    TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE, click the link below:

    The psychological aftermath of exposure to DV can include fear of harm or abandonment, excessive worry or sadness, guilt, inability to experience empathy or guilt, habitual lying, low frustration tolerance, emotional distancing, poor judgment, shame, and fear about the future

    The attention given, emotions felt, and memories imprinted onto a child’s brain in moments of stress become inextricably linked together and forever taint—or else filter—feelings, beliefs, and choices in relationships and so many other facets of life. These children are not merely innocent bystanders. They are victims.

    To read the full article, click here.


    Domestic violence victims face risk of being attacked again
    following Cook County reforms, a Tribune investigation found

    By David Jackson and Madeline Buckley
    CHICAGO TRIBUNE - May 2, 2019

    Children exposed to domestic violence may experience a range of difficulties….

    …Cook County judges have sharply lowered bonds for people accused of violent domestic attacks and prosecutors are dropping more of these cases, placing victims at risk as potentially dangerous suspects are released from custody… The changes follow efforts by top county officials to reduce jail overcrowding and address long-standing racial inequities in bonds that can keep defendants in custody simply because they cannot pay… Police, prosecutors and lawmakers have long recognized that the repetitive nature of domestic violence leaves victims at particular risk from alleged attackers who are released from custody

    Illinois laws recognize the escalating and repetitious nature of domestic violence and the need to separate the parties involved to reduce further abuse, the Illinois Supreme Court held in the 1995 decision Calloway v. Kinkelaar. These victims are most in peril after their attackers are charged, advocates say. “I can’t think of any other crime where the perpetrator goes back to the scene of the crime and sets up housekeeping with impunity,” said Joyce Coffee, who runs the Family Rescue nonprofit that works with Chicago police and the courts.

    Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Katharine Baker described the special risks presented by domestic abusers. “What is curious about this class of perpetrators is they usually have one person in mind and they’re going right after that person. They present a profound danger not to the community at large, but to that one victim,” Baker said.

    To read the full article, click here.

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